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How do we know what tomorrow will bring. We should not be anxious for tomorrow and just take care of today. That is not easy to do at this time. For many weeks we have listened to the news regarding this Coronavirus and what to except.  Did we think that we would be buying weeks of groceries and planning on staying home for many weeks?Probably not.

Our schools have been closed for two weeks and now the Governor of Minnesota has school closed for many more weeks. All to keep us safe and to slow down this virus. We are to stay in our homes and be safe. No social contact with family and loved ones.  No Churches to attend to be comforted and to pray.

This is the way my parents had to feel when I came down with the polio virus 72 years ago. When my mom came to the corn field that October morning in 1948 to get my father to take me to the hospital.  The neighbors had to be very frightened for their young families. Just as we all are today.

We must follow the recommendations for us and keep our health care workers in our thoughts and prayers as they work to help those in need. All our volunteers, truck drivers, groceries store as they keep supplies that we need.

Caring from afar for one another in thoughts and prayers.

Brrr It is cold outside

Blog #2                                  Brrrrrrr, It is cold outside.

 

In the Midwest we have been experiencing extremely cold temperatures. We are in a 72 hour weather warning which started on Saturday, January 16, 2016. It will continue into Monday. Forecasters warned of being in the temperatures for extended periods of time. Our rural church was cancelled last evening in anticipation for today’s Sunday worship. With many elderly folks we do not want them to be out in minus -40 degree weather. With social media I hope all got the message to stay home and be safe. Our church prayer chain was also activated last evening to get the message to as many as possible.

Winter is a time to slow down and stay inside. For me, a time to get things accomplished that get overlooked during the rest of the year. The only occupation that does not feel this slower pace would be a dairy, cattle farmer or rancher. With the extra work that comes their way with caring for their cattle it can require a lot more time and energy.

My father’s occupation was a dairy farmer. He loved those cows. Hard work, yes, but he did it his whole life until retirement. Tomorrow will mark the third anniversary of his death. After years of his battle with cancer his journey ended on January 18, 2013. The weather was much as it now. We looked at the upcoming weather and decided that we should have his funeral service on January 22, 2013 because the weather should have been not so cold. That plan did not work out so well because when we arrived at the church and started getting things ready for the service we discovered that the water was frozen. We could not begin to start making coffee and then realized that we also could not flush the stools. With 150-200 people going to be arriving soon that was not a good thing. The local well digger came, thawed out the pump and things would be just fine.

My father-in-law had his wake on the eve of the Midwest Hall-o-ween storm of 1991. Another Midwest winter snow storm. His service was postponed for five days and moved to a church in town from the same rural church because of no electricity.

Tomorrow schools, in our area, will be starting 2 hours late as the –temperatures continue into Monday. A break will follow the next day. Our 72 hours will be over.

A time in my past was shared with a very good friend as we enjoyed some time in the snow on the farm. Lots of fun things do take place in the winter with snowmobiling, skating, sledding and hockey. When our children were small a horse pulling a sleigh through the woods made a wonderful Sunday afternoon activity. With 63 days until spring we will need to find beauty in the snow covered trees, hoarfrost, sundogs and enjoy the beauty of winter. It will soon be over.

Spring is just 63 days (March 20, 2016) away. Camping season is just around the corner. Really—Camping is just around the corner. Stay warm.

 

Brrrrrrr,It is cold outside.

Blog #2                                  Brrrrrrr, It is cold outside.

 

In the Midwest we have been experiencing extremely cold temperatures. We are in a 72 hour weather warning which started on Saturday, January 16, 2016. It will continue into Monday. Forecasters warned of being in the temperatures for extended periods of time. Our rural church was cancelled last evening in anticipation for today’s Sunday worship. With many elderly folks we do not want them to be out in minus -40 degree weather. With social media I hope all got the message to stay home and be safe. Our church prayer chain was also activated last evening to get the message to as many as possible.

Winter is a time to slow down and stay inside. For me, a time to get things accomplished that get overlooked during the rest of the year. The only occupation that does not feel this slower pace would be a dairy, cattle farmer or rancher. With the extra work that comes their way with caring for their cattle it can require a lot more time and energy.

My father’s occupation was a dairy farmer. He loved those cows. Hard work, yes, but he did it his whole life until retirement. Tomorrow will mark the third anniversary of his death. After years of his battle with cancer his journey ended on January 18, 2013. The weather was much as it now. We looked at the upcoming weather and decided that we should have his funeral service on January 22, 2013 because the weather should have been not so cold. That plan did not work out so well because when we arrived at the church and started getting things ready for the service we discovered that the water was frozen. We could not begin to start making coffee and then realized that we also could not flush the stools. With 150-200 people going to be arriving soon that was not a good thing. The local well digger came, thawed out the pump and things would be just fine.

My father-in-law had his wake on the eve of the Midwest Hall-o-ween storm of 1991. Another Midwest winter snow storm. His service was postponed for five days and moved to a church in town from the same rural church because of no electricity.

Tomorrow schools, in our area, will be starting 2 hours late as the –temperatures continue into Monday. A break will follow the next day. Our 72 hours will be over.

A time in my past was shared with a very good friend as we enjoyed some time in the snow on the farm. Lots of fun things do take place in the winter with snowmobiling, skating, sledding and hockey. When our children were small a horse pulling a sleigh through the woods made a wonderful Sunday afternoon activity. With 63 days until spring we will need to find beauty in the snow covered trees, hoarfrost, sundogs and enjoy the beauty of winter. It will soon be over.

Spring is just 63 days (March 20, 2016) away. Camping season is just around the corner. Really—Camping is just around the corner. Stay warm.

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Reflections from a polio immunization team to Nigeria

work is continuing until the job is done we End Polio Now.

Rotary Voices

By Richard Rivkin, assistant governor of District 6440 (Illinois, USA)

I have been home for several days now, decompressing and reflecting on what we have accomplished during our polio immunization team’s trip to Nigeria. It seems like so long ago that the idea of organizing a trip to Nigeria was first conceived. 

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It’s only me?

I have been learning alot of new things the last few weeks and I am just here to tell you that it can be done.  I never thought it would be possible for me to learn so many new things. But an old mind, if giving enough time and lots of practice, can make it work. I have used all the patience that I carry with me every day, a lot of prayer,  and a tremendous amount of persistance. I knew it could be accomplished if I just stayed with it.

This beautiful Autumn day has made me thankful for all that I have been able to accomplish. Not only the publishing of my book,  “All the Steps I Have Taken”, but in all that I have managed to do this week. Tomorrow I will be celebrating the life of a dear friend that will no longer “Journery” with me. She will be missed by many.  I finished reading my book to some of the residents at the Heather Haus, an assisted living facility in Blooming Prairie, Minnesota.  I visited with them for four Tuesday mornings.  Each time I went I took one of my braces that I wore during my growing up years. They seemed to enjoy our time together. I know I did.  I also had the opportunity to have two book signings and visited with lots of people. My husband and I enjoyed a cup of coffee with two dear friends this morning. We had dinner guest one evening and tonight we will enjoy our  grandchildren and many neighberhood children “Trick and Treating”.

How’s your week going?  Make it the best it can be. I know I am enjoying mine to the fullest.

Linda L. ChristiansonPolio surviver, All the Steps I Have Taken

Go Above and Beyond or do Nothing? It’s your Choice.

Go Above and Beyond or do nothing?   It’s your choice.

Polio, Dad and daughter, Surviver, All the Steps,

Dad and me at ST. Mary’s

“I didn’t choose polio. I didn’t choose the crutches, cane, and braces; I chose to thrive.”  Thriving is what I did from as early as I can remember.  So little I was when polio had a chance to slow me down. I do not remember those days when my parents had to leave me at St. Mary’s Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. How heart breaking it would have been for my young parents to come to visit me and I didn’t respond to them as my parents. My hospital stays were long and I am very sure the nurses did the best they could to provide the nurturing care that I needed as an infant, but there is nothing like a mother and fathers love.

It has always been, and continues today, that I do the very best I can with any task that I put in place. If something is worth doing, it is worth doing well.  My children dreaded summer when 4-H projects were due for the county fair. They didn’t care so much for the theory that I had about doing their project “right”. But “right” is what won Blue ribbons and a chance to advance to State fair.  Many State fair trips were won.  Now they look back and realize that “right” is the way to go. The best part is that now it is their choice and not mine.

polio, mom and me, All the Steps, family,

Mom and me at St. Mary’s Hospital

Now, as an adult, my physical limitations do make a difference in how I finish projects. They are still finished in the proper manner but it takes a lot more time and effort and it is hard for me to realize that I may not get it all done today. The sun will always come out tomorrow and deadlines can be managed by being extremely organized and focused. It is now possible for me to say “NO” on occasion if I think the project will be more difficult than I care to pursue.  Whatever handicap polio has left me with; polio will never claim my life or my spirit. My morning jump start with my prayer time and coffee always get off to a running start. “Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil.  It has no point.” I am going to keep my pencil very sharp.

I know that my family appreciates all that I can do for them.  Each day will begin with early morning phone calls from them with things I can do to help make their day more manageable. I always am most happy to be able to help them anyway that I can.

I chose to go above and beyond. What will you choose?

Annivarsary picture, polio, gathering

Christianson Family